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Telephone Check for Older Adults

 

Social isolation is a growing health epidemic, affecting more than 8 million older adults.
There are nearly 37,000 older adults living alone in the Metro East. 82% of the individuals who participated in AgeSmart programs in last year lived alone among those are Meals on Wheels participants are frail and many need assistance to live safely at home.

To address the need of older adults who are socially isolated, AgeSmart is developing a Telephone Reassurance Program. A telephone reassurance call is one of the most effective means of reducing isolation. AgeSmart will be collaborating with a faith-based organization in East St. Louis to provide Telephone Reassurance program. East St. Louis and its surrounding communities have high concentration of low-income minority population. 25% of AgeSmart’s Meals on Wheels participants are provided in East St. Louis and 85% of the meal recipients live alone. Due to decreasing number of volunteers and increasing costs of preparation and delivery of meals, the meal provider currently provides frozen meals only through a weekly delivery, which limits their opportunity to check on the wellbeing of the clients.

The proposed telephone reassurance program will be built upon the existing volunteer-based model, which serves a limited area in East St. Louis. To get on the list for a call contact AgeSmart at 618-222-2561.

The Beet Box is Coming to AgeSmart

The Beet Box, supported primarily by the Goshen Market Foundation, as well as numerous community partners, has officially hit the road to offer affordable fresh vegetables to individuals. AgeSmart is happy to announce that the Beet Box will be at their location starting on July 15 every Monday from 1-3:00 pm. During that time eligible seniors can also get coupons for the participating farmers markets. The Beet Box accepts SNAP, WIC and Senior Coupons!

“The Goshen Market’s broader vision is supporting a healthy, local food community,” said Jessica Despain, PhD, president of the Goshen Market Foundation and associate professor in the SIUE College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of English Language and Literature. “The Beet Box supports that mission by bringing affordable produce from local farmers and SIUE’s Rooftop Teaching Gardens to neighborhoods and community centers whose residents lack access to healthy foods as a result of food-desert conditions.”

Farmer’s Market Coupons are also available at AgeSmart on Mondays, 12-3:00 pm and Thursdays 9-12:00 PM beginning July 11th. Seniors with and income of $23,107 annually are eligible for Senior Farmers Market Coupons.

The Basics of Medicare

Whether you’re new to Medicare, getting ready to turn 65, are well over 65 or a caregiver of someone on Medicare, there is always something to learn about Medicare coverage.  Things to consider are your current doctors, hospital choice, pharmacy access, and do you travel.  The great thing is everyone can access a personalized health insurance counselor at no cost through their local Senior Health Insurance Program (SHIP).

There are four different parts of Medicare: Part A (Hospital Insurance), Part B (Medical Insurance), Part C (Medicare Advantage Plans) and Part D (Pharmaceutical Coverage).  Each of these parts cover specific services.  There are only certain times when people can enroll in Medicare. Depending on the situation, some people may get Medicare automatically, and others need to apply for Medicare. The first time you can enroll is called your Initial Enrollment Period. Your 7-month Initial Enrollment Period is usually:

  • The 3 months before the month you turn 65
  • and the month you turn 65
  • Ends 3 months after the month you turn 65

If you don’t enroll when you’re first eligible, you may have to pay a Part B late enrollment penalty, and you may have a gap in coverage if you decide you want Part B later.  Everyone’s situation is different.

Most people should enroll in Part A when they turn 65.  This is because most people paid Medicare taxes while they worked so they are eligible for premium free Part A. Certain people may choose to delay Part B depending on their or their spouse’s employment situation. Everyone pays a monthly premium for Part B. Most people will pay the standard premium amount of $135.50 in 2019.  The premium may vary depending on your income and when you enroll in Part B.   Prescription drug coverage through Part D varies by cost, coverage, and convenience depending on the medications a person takes. A SHIP counselor can help you chose the right plan for you based on your individual needs.

AgeSmart is hosting Medicare 101 Training for those of you who are new to Medicare,  recent Medicare recipient or caregiver of someone on Medicare. The date for this training is:

July 9, 2019 at 1:00 pm, and an evening session at 7:00 pm

If you are familiar with Medicare and would like to dive deeper into the details, there is a Medicare 201 session.  The date for that session is:

July 24, 2019 at 1:00 pm and an evening session at 7:00 pm

Both trainings are at AgeSmart Community Resources 801 West State Street O’Fallon, IL  62269.  The sessions are free.  Call 618-222-2561 to register.

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American Heart Month

 

 

 

 

What is American Heart Month?

American Heart Month, a federally designated event, is an ideal time to remind Americans to focus on their hearts and encourage them to get their families, friends and communities involved.

• The first American Heart Month, which took place in February 1964, was proclaimed by President Lyndon B. Johnson via Proclamation 3566 on December 30, 1963.

• The Congress, by joint resolution on that date, has requested the President to issue annually a proclamation designating February as American Heart Month.

• At that time, more than half the deaths in the U.S. were caused by cardiovascular disease.

• While American Heart Month is a federally designated month in the United States, it’s important to realize that cardiovascular disease knows no borders. Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, remains the leading global cause of death with more than 17.9 million deaths each year.

That number is expected to rise to more than 23.6 million by 2030.

Nearly half of all U.S. adults have some type of cardiovascular disease, a percentage that reflects recently updated guidelines for treating high blood pressure, according to a new report. High blood pressure – also known as hypertension – can lead to heart attack, heart failure and stroke.

“We’re becoming more and more aware of the importance of high blood pressure. Levels we used to think were normal we now associate with worse outcomes, and treating them makes a big difference,” said Dr. Emelia J. Benjamin, a professor of cardiology at Boston University and chair of the group that wrote the American Heart Association’s “Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2019 Update”.

The report, published Thursday in the AHA journal Circulation, has been released annually since 1958 and is based on data from the National Institutes of Health and other government sources. This year’s report said 121.5 million adults in the U.S. – 48 percent based on 2016 figures – has cardiovascular disease. Heart disease was the No. 1 cause of death in the U.S. and stroke was No. 5, the same ranking as in the previous year.

For more information, visit: www.heart.org/en/news/2019/01/31/cardiovascular-diseases-affect-nearly-half-of-american-adults-statistics-show

Friendship Line

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRIENDSHIP……..

“Our connections to others are what bind us to life.”
– Patrick Arbore

 

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, They created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Their trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

• Providing emotional support
• Elder abuse reporting
• Grief support through assistance and reassurance
• Active suicide intervention
• Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities.

Friendship Line 1-800-971-0016
Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares. -Institute on Aging

 

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Home Delivered Meals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When older adults cannot leave their homes and cannot personally prepare nutritious meals, home delivered meals are an available option.  Volunteers who deliver meals to homebound older persons have an important opportunity to check on the welfare of the homebound elderly and are encouraged to report any health or other problems that they may observe during their visits.

AgeSmart funds 10 nutrition providers throughout 7 counties serving over 1200 meals every day. Last year, we provided 330,000 meals 2200 unduplicated clients.

 

To be eligible for HDM, an older adult must be assessed by CCU.
Must be 60 or older / adult child with disability living with an eligible older adult
Not means-tested
No charge / suggested donation only – $ goes back into program to maintain program

 

Here is a list of providers in your community:

Bond County
Bond County Senior Center
1001 E. Harris Ave
Greenville, IL 62246

618-664-1465

Clinton Country
Clinton County Senior Service Inc.
630 Eighth Street
Carlyle, IL 62231

618-594-2321

O.W. Billhartz Civic Center
100 East Birch
New Baden, IL 62265

618-224-9913

Western Clinton Co. Senior Services
520 North Main Street
Trenton, IL 62293

618-224-9913

Madison County
Senior Services Plus
2603 North Rodgers Avenue
Alton, IL 62002

618-465-3298

Granite City Nutrition Site
2060 Delmar Avenue
Granite City, IL 62040

618-877-0513

Monroe County
Columbia Senior Center
Immaculate Conception Catholic Church
411 Palmer Road
Columbia, IL 62236

618-281-7414

Waterloo Senior Multipurpose Center

207 West 4th Street

Waterloo, IL 62298

618-939-8880

Randolph County
Sparta Senior Multipurpose Center
500 West Second Street
Sparta, IL 62286

618-443-4020

Chester Senior Multipurpose Center
805 State Street
Chester, IL 62233

618-826-5108

Red Bud Senior Center
1445 West Market
Red Bud, IL 62278

618-282-6333

Steeleville Senior Center
107 West Broadway
Steeleville, IL 62288

618-965-3134

St. Clair County
Mascoutah Senior Center
227 North Market Street
Mascoutah, IL 62258

618-566-8758

Millstadt Senior Center
102 South Jefferson Street
Millstadt, IL 62260

618-476-3731

Seasoned Circle Café
1274 N. 37th Street
East St. Louis, IL 62205

618-271-2522

Washington County
Nashville Nutrition Site
454 North Hoffman
Nashville, IL 62263

618-327-4078

Okawville Nutrition Site
305 North Nashville Street
Okawville, IL 62271

618-243-6605

618-243-6533

 

If you want to learn more about the services available in your area visit our website….http://agesmart.org/services-in-your-area/.

 

 

 

 

 

Embrace Your Aging with Aging Mastery Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americans are living longer. America’s older population will double by 2030 and 20% of the population will be 65 years and older by 2050. Education and resources that empowers people to embrace their longevity and live their lives to the fullest is more important than ever. As children, we learn how to be successful adults, but no one teaches us how to age well. As a result, most are unprepared for this new stage in life.

Enter Aging Mastery Program.

Developed by National Council on Aging, the Aging Mastery Program® is a comprehensive evidence-based program that is designed to inform, encourage, and support older adults as they take steps to improve their lives and stay engaged in their communities. The program incorporates evidence-informed materials, expert speakers, group discussion, peer support, and small rewards to give participants the skills and tools they need to achieve measurable improvements in managing their health, remaining economically secure, and increasing social connectedness.

Core curriculum of this 10-session workshop includes topics such as healthy eating and hydration, sleep, financial fitness, advance planning, medication management, and healthy relationships. The program encourages individuals to make and maintain small, impactful changes to their behaviors to live a healthier, happier, and more secure life.

Ready to embrace your own aging? Registration for our upcoming Aging Mastery Program® is now open. We hope to see you there!

Shiloh Senior Center
7 Park Dr. Shiloh, IL 62269
Tuesday, March 5 – May 7, 10:00 – 12:00
To register, call 314-862-4859, ext. 24.

To learn about other wellness programs, contact AgeSmart at 618-222-2561.

Social Isolation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within normal circumstances related to age, this can cause an older adult to lose connections. This loss of connection has a real impact on a person’s overall health. People need social connections to thrive. About 29% of people 65 and over live alone. The potential of prolonged isolation can be as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. (AARP Foundation 2012) Loneliness is linked to serious health problems and death among older adults. (University of California San Francisco June 2012)

In the Metro East there are approximately 30,000 older adults who have the potential of being isolated or lonely. This is a topic many do not think about and people may not even realize they are experiencing loneliness. In the UK, there is a Ministry for loneliness because they recognize the negative health effects. Loneliness is not a normal part of aging. We need greater awareness that it is a severe problem and many reminders to stay connected with family and friends.
For more information contact AgeSmart at 618-222-2561.

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Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurse Association Celebrates its 100th Anniversary

 

Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurse Association Celebrates its

100th Anniversary

A walk through the last 100 years.

Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurse Association (SIVNA) officially began on January 1, 1918 with a staff of five nurses and sixty-three patients transferred from the St. Louis Visiting Nurse Association.  Cash on hand was $600 in borrowed funds and a contract with Metropolitan Life Insurance Company to provide nursing care to eligible policy-holders. Currently SIVNA has a staff of 92 and serve just over 10,000 people in 2017.

Providing nursing care to the sick and injured in their home regardless of race, creed or their ability to pay and working with community organizations to improve the health of its residents was what drove their work in 1918 and still does today.  The great influenza pandemic of 1918 enabled the agency to provide a valuable service to the community.   During that epidemic between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5 percent of the world’s population.  That was the beginning of a long tradition of caring for the SIVNA.

Many of the projects SIVNA pioneered have become the function of state and local agencies such as the Child Welfare Program.  In their first year 3,188 infants and children to age 6 were weighed, measured and given nutritional counseling.  This was a joint program of SIVNA, Red Cross and a child specialist.  These later became the infant welfare conferences and were continued by the East Side Health District when it was organized in 1937.

SIVNA worked closely with the Tuberculosis Society in providing nursing care to the tuberculosis patients.  During 1921, these two organizations working with a physician began school health examinations.  Also in 1921, assisted by the State Board of Health, four clinics for crippled children were conducted.  A special fund was established by the Board to pay for braces, casts and other corrective appliances.

The East St. Louis Journal assisted the agency in establishing a milk and ice fund for indigent infants and children.  This fund was established in 1921 and continued through 1945. Dental health was another concern in the early years.  Queen’s Daughters assisted in the purchase and distribution of toothbrushes for every school child in East St. Louis.

The 50’s and 60’s brought new organizations and additional community services.  In 1951, SIVNA began to work with the Cancer Society which furnished funds for nursing care of cancer patients, dressings and supplies.  In 1959, the George Washington Hi-12 Club began their hospital bed project with 35 beds.  This project was carried on by a special committee of the club.

January 1959, the SIVNA Board gave their approval to serve as the parent organization for the proposed home care program.  January 1960, rehabilitative restorative nursing was initiated.  One nurse attended a special course at the Rusk Institute in New York an on July 1, 1961, a homemaker program began on a three-year pilot basis with private funding administered by a Board of Directors.  The coordination of health services, home-helper, or home health aide services has been an invaluable supplement to the nursing program. On July 1, 1966, SIVNA became a provider under Medicare.  SIVNA was instrumental in working with the Medicare program in the early years as problems were identified and worked through.

A grant under the Older Americans Act of 1965 made it possible to extend services to cover all of St. Clair County.  The Illinois Department of Public Aid, St. Clair County Board of Supervisors, together with agency personnel and equipment, enabled SIVNA to qualify for these funds.  The grant was for a three-year period and provided nursing care to patients age 60 and over.  This program officially began January 1, 1967.

Changes in funding and Medicare services indicated the need for a merger of the Home Care Association and SIVNA.  The Home Health Aide Service became certified July 1, 1967 and final details of the merger were completed January 1, 1968.

During the 70’s and 80’s, the agency continued its growth and expansion of programs.  The hospital coordinating role was initiated to establish a closer working relationship with hospitals, physicians, and patients.  Under Title III, Home Health Service was expanded to Monroe County and a homemaker program was initiated.

In 1983, through a contract with the Illinois Department on Aging, and the Area Agency on Aging of Southwestern Illinois (now AgeSmart Community Resources), the agency became responsible for the Care Coordination Unit (CCU) and Title III programs.  Assessments for homemaker, housekeeping, chore, daycare, and pre-screenings for nursing home placement are performed by SIVNA care coordinators in our service area.

December 1990, a contract was signed with the Illinois Department on Aging to follow up on victims of adult abuse.  SIVNA’s team of Senior Protective Services was one of the first in the state established to participate in the program.

In 1996, the Choices for Care Program was initiated by the Illinois Department on Aging to provide early counseling to individuals seeking long term care services before being discharged from the hospital.  SIVNA’s CCU has experienced care coordinators who explain all available alternatives to those in need of long term care, including services that can be provided at home. In 2000 SIVNA’s Care Coordination Unit was awarded additional territory by the Illinois Department on Aging. The CCU now serves the Illinois counties of St. Clair, Madison, Monroe, Randolph, Washington, Bond and Clinton.

In 2013, SIVNA’s Senior Protective Services was expanded to serve disabled adults as well.  The program’s name was changed to Adult Protective Services.

Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurse Association continues now as in years past to provide superior individualized care to residents in our service area.  SIVNA is uniquely able to meet all the needs of area residents who seek to maintain their independence and dignity. Congratulations on 100 years!

 

For more information about SIVNA visit their website at sivna.com or give them a call 618-236-5863