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HEAT ADVISORY- Information and Cooling Sites

Heat indices for the Greater St. Louis Metro area are expected to be around 110 degrees today.  For a list of cooling centers in Illinois click one of the image below or go to http://www.211helps.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/MO-Cooling-Sites-w-KC-7.17.19.pdf,  this list includes cooing sites for St. Louis Metro East area.  For more information on what to do during the extreme heat read information below from ready.gov.

Please remember to check on older adults in your life and those working outside.

          

 

What to do in Extreme Heat From www.ready.gov/heat

Extreme Heat

Extreme Heat often results in the highest number of annual deaths among all weather-related hazards. In most of the United States, extreme heat is defined as a long period (2 to 3 days) of high heat and humidity with temperatures above 90 degrees. In extreme heat, evaporation is slowed and the body must work extra hard to maintain a normal temperature. This can lead to death by overworking the human body. Remember that:

  • Extreme heat can occur quickly and without warning.
  • Older adults, children, and sick or overweight individuals are at greater risk from extreme heat.
  • Humidity increases the feeling of heat as measured by a heat index.

IF YOU ARE UNDER AN EXTREME HEAT WARNING:

  • Find air conditioning.
  • Avoid strenuous activities.
  • Watch for heat illness.
  • Wear light clothing.
  • Check on family members and neighbors.
  • Drink plenty of fluids.
  • Watch for heat cramps, heat exhaustion, and heat stroke.
  • Never leave people or pets in a closed car.

HOW TO STAY SAFE WHEN EXTREME HEAT THREATENS

Prepare NOW

  • Find places in your community where you can go to get cool.
  • Keep your home cool by doing the following:
    • Cover windows with drapes or shades.
    • Weather-strip doors and windows.
    • Use window reflectors, such as aluminum foil-covered cardboard, to reflect heat back outside.
    • Add insulation to keep the heat out.
    • Use attic fans to clear hot air.
    • Install window air conditioners and insulate around them.
  • Learn to recognize the signs of heat-related illness.

Be Safe DURING

  • Never leave a child, adult, or animal alone inside a vehicle on a warm day.
  • Find places with air conditioning. Libraries, shopping malls, and community centers can provide a cool place to take a break from the heat.
  • If you’re outside, find shade. Wear a hat wide enough to protect your face.
  • Wear loose, lightweight, light-colored clothing.
  • Drink plenty of fluids to stay hydrated. If you or someone you care for is on a special diet, ask a doctor how best to accommodate it.
  • Do not use electric fans when the temperature outside is more than 95 degrees, as this could increase the risk of heat-related illness. Fans create air flow and a false sense of comfort, but do not reduce body temperature.
  • Avoid high-energy activities.
  • Check yourself, family members, and neighbors for signs of heat-related illness.

RECOGNIZE AND RESPOND

Know the signs of heat-related illness and the ways to respond to it:

  • HEAT CRAMPS
    • Signs: Muscle pains or spasms in the stomach, arms, or legs
    • Actions: Go to a cooler location. Remove excess clothing. Take sips of cool sports drinks with salt and sugar. Get medical help if cramps last more than an hour.
  • HEAT EXHAUSTION
    • Signs: Heavy sweating, paleness, muscle cramps, tiredness, weakness, dizziness, headache, nausea or vomiting, or fainting
    • Actions: Go to an air-conditioned place and lie down. Loosen or remove clothing. Take a cool bath. Take sips of cool sports drinks with salt and sugar. Get medical help if symptoms get worse or last more than an hour.
  • HEAT STROKE
    • Signs: Extremely high body temperature (above 103 degrees) taken orally; red, hot, and dry skin with no sweat; rapid, strong pulse; dizziness; confusion; or unconsciousness
    • Actions: Call 911 or get the person to a hospital immediately. Cool down with whatever methods are available until medical help arrives.

Telephone Check for Older Adults

 

Social isolation is a growing health epidemic, affecting more than 8 million older adults.
There are nearly 37,000 older adults living alone in the Metro East. 82% of the individuals who participated in AgeSmart programs in last year lived alone among those are Meals on Wheels participants are frail and many need assistance to live safely at home.

To address the need of older adults who are socially isolated, AgeSmart is developing a Telephone Reassurance Program. A telephone reassurance call is one of the most effective means of reducing isolation. AgeSmart will be collaborating with a faith-based organization in East St. Louis to provide Telephone Reassurance program. East St. Louis and its surrounding communities have high concentration of low-income minority population. 25% of AgeSmart’s Meals on Wheels participants are provided in East St. Louis and 85% of the meal recipients live alone. Due to decreasing number of volunteers and increasing costs of preparation and delivery of meals, the meal provider currently provides frozen meals only through a weekly delivery, which limits their opportunity to check on the wellbeing of the clients.

The proposed telephone reassurance program will be built upon the existing volunteer-based model, which serves a limited area in East St. Louis. To get on the list for a call contact AgeSmart at 618-222-2561.

The Beet Box is Coming to AgeSmart

The Beet Box, supported primarily by the Goshen Market Foundation, as well as numerous community partners, has officially hit the road to offer affordable fresh vegetables to individuals. AgeSmart is happy to announce that the Beet Box will be at their location starting on July 15 every Monday from 1-3:00 pm. During that time eligible seniors can also get coupons for the participating farmers markets. The Beet Box accepts SNAP, WIC and Senior Coupons!

“The Goshen Market’s broader vision is supporting a healthy, local food community,” said Jessica Despain, PhD, president of the Goshen Market Foundation and associate professor in the SIUE College of Arts and Sciences’ Department of English Language and Literature. “The Beet Box supports that mission by bringing affordable produce from local farmers and SIUE’s Rooftop Teaching Gardens to neighborhoods and community centers whose residents lack access to healthy foods as a result of food-desert conditions.”

Farmer’s Market Coupons are also available at AgeSmart on Mondays, 12-3:00 pm and Thursdays 9-12:00 PM beginning July 11th. Seniors with and income of $23,107 annually are eligible for Senior Farmers Market Coupons.

The Basics of Medicare

Whether you’re new to Medicare, getting ready to turn 65, are well over 65 or a caregiver of someone on Medicare, there is always something to learn about Medicare coverage.  Things to consider are your current doctors, hospital choice, pharmacy access, and do you travel.  The great thing is everyone can access a personalized health insurance counselor at no cost through their local Senior Health Insurance Program (SHIP).

There are four different parts of Medicare: Part A (Hospital Insurance), Part B (Medical Insurance), Part C (Medicare Advantage Plans) and Part D (Pharmaceutical Coverage).  Each of these parts cover specific services.  There are only certain times when people can enroll in Medicare. Depending on the situation, some people may get Medicare automatically, and others need to apply for Medicare. The first time you can enroll is called your Initial Enrollment Period. Your 7-month Initial Enrollment Period is usually:

  • The 3 months before the month you turn 65
  • and the month you turn 65
  • Ends 3 months after the month you turn 65

If you don’t enroll when you’re first eligible, you may have to pay a Part B late enrollment penalty, and you may have a gap in coverage if you decide you want Part B later.  Everyone’s situation is different.

Most people should enroll in Part A when they turn 65.  This is because most people paid Medicare taxes while they worked so they are eligible for premium free Part A. Certain people may choose to delay Part B depending on their or their spouse’s employment situation. Everyone pays a monthly premium for Part B. Most people will pay the standard premium amount of $135.50 in 2019.  The premium may vary depending on your income and when you enroll in Part B.   Prescription drug coverage through Part D varies by cost, coverage, and convenience depending on the medications a person takes. A SHIP counselor can help you chose the right plan for you based on your individual needs.

AgeSmart is hosting Medicare 101 Training for those of you who are new to Medicare,  recent Medicare recipient or caregiver of someone on Medicare. The date for this training is:

July 9, 2019 at 1:00 pm, and an evening session at 7:00 pm

If you are familiar with Medicare and would like to dive deeper into the details, there is a Medicare 201 session.  The date for that session is:

July 24, 2019 at 1:00 pm and an evening session at 7:00 pm

Both trainings are at AgeSmart Community Resources 801 West State Street O’Fallon, IL  62269.  The sessions are free.  Call 618-222-2561 to register.

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How to Talk to You Employer about Your Caregiver Support Needs

Caring for your dad is becoming more difficult. You’re exhausted and struggling to keep up with your workload. Maybe it’s impacting multiple areas of your life.

Majorities of respondents in a survey of North American working family caregivers, conducted by Home Instead, Inc., franchisor of the Home Instead Senior Care® network, report caregiving has put a strain on multiple aspects of their lives including:

Finances (60 percent)
Physical and mental health (74 percent and 81 percent, respectively)
Career (65 percent)
Ability to manage work/life balance (83 percent)

Not only do you like your job, you need it to pay the bills. So how do you broach the subject of family caregiving without the fear that you could be jeopardizing your job?

“Do you know I am taking care of my dad? I would love to tell you a little about him and what I am doing to care for him. I am looking for ways to ensure I am always doing the best I can at work and at home.”

“I hope you know how much I value my job. That’s why I would like to make sure that my work is covered in the event of a family emergency. I would love to learn about any services our company has that could help me. And then, it would be great to work with you to put together a plan.”

“My dad needs to spend a week in the hospital next month and I would like to be with him since I am his caregiver. I have jotted down some ideas for how I could cover my job and my work while I’m gone. Could I schedule some time to discuss this with you?”

“A flexible start time would help me so much in ensuring that my father’s needs are covered before I leave for work. I believe that would help me be more productive on the job. Can I count on the company’s understanding?”
Think about ways to make the most of the time you have with your boss.

It is important to suggest ideas that work for both your employer and you, and to provide an opportunity to test out your plan to make sure that it does, in fact, work.

 

Learn More at: DaughtersintheWorkplace.com

 

 

American Heart Month

 

 

 

 

What is American Heart Month?

American Heart Month, a federally designated event, is an ideal time to remind Americans to focus on their hearts and encourage them to get their families, friends and communities involved.

• The first American Heart Month, which took place in February 1964, was proclaimed by President Lyndon B. Johnson via Proclamation 3566 on December 30, 1963.

• The Congress, by joint resolution on that date, has requested the President to issue annually a proclamation designating February as American Heart Month.

• At that time, more than half the deaths in the U.S. were caused by cardiovascular disease.

• While American Heart Month is a federally designated month in the United States, it’s important to realize that cardiovascular disease knows no borders. Cardiovascular disease, including heart disease and stroke, remains the leading global cause of death with more than 17.9 million deaths each year.

That number is expected to rise to more than 23.6 million by 2030.

Nearly half of all U.S. adults have some type of cardiovascular disease, a percentage that reflects recently updated guidelines for treating high blood pressure, according to a new report. High blood pressure – also known as hypertension – can lead to heart attack, heart failure and stroke.

“We’re becoming more and more aware of the importance of high blood pressure. Levels we used to think were normal we now associate with worse outcomes, and treating them makes a big difference,” said Dr. Emelia J. Benjamin, a professor of cardiology at Boston University and chair of the group that wrote the American Heart Association’s “Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics-2019 Update”.

The report, published Thursday in the AHA journal Circulation, has been released annually since 1958 and is based on data from the National Institutes of Health and other government sources. This year’s report said 121.5 million adults in the U.S. – 48 percent based on 2016 figures – has cardiovascular disease. Heart disease was the No. 1 cause of death in the U.S. and stroke was No. 5, the same ranking as in the previous year.

For more information, visit: www.heart.org/en/news/2019/01/31/cardiovascular-diseases-affect-nearly-half-of-american-adults-statistics-show

Friendship Line

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRIENDSHIP……..

“Our connections to others are what bind us to life.”
– Patrick Arbore

 

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, They created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Their trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

• Providing emotional support
• Elder abuse reporting
• Grief support through assistance and reassurance
• Active suicide intervention
• Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities.

Friendship Line 1-800-971-0016
Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares. -Institute on Aging

 

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Home Delivered Meals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When older adults cannot leave their homes and cannot personally prepare nutritious meals, home delivered meals are an available option.  Volunteers who deliver meals to homebound older persons have an important opportunity to check on the welfare of the homebound elderly and are encouraged to report any health or other problems that they may observe during their visits.

AgeSmart funds 10 nutrition providers throughout 7 counties serving over 1200 meals every day. Last year, we provided 330,000 meals 2200 unduplicated clients.

 

To be eligible for HDM, an older adult must be assessed by CCU.
Must be 60 or older / adult child with disability living with an eligible older adult
Not means-tested
No charge / suggested donation only – $ goes back into program to maintain program

 

Here is a list of providers in your community:

Bond County
Bond County Senior Center
1001 E. Harris Ave
Greenville, IL 62246

618-664-1465

Clinton Country
Clinton County Senior Service Inc.
630 Eighth Street
Carlyle, IL 62231

618-594-2321

O.W. Billhartz Civic Center
100 East Birch
New Baden, IL 62265

618-224-9913

Western Clinton Co. Senior Services
520 North Main Street
Trenton, IL 62293

618-224-9913

Madison County
Senior Services Plus
2603 North Rodgers Avenue
Alton, IL 62002

618-465-3298

Granite City Nutrition Site
2060 Delmar Avenue
Granite City, IL 62040

618-877-0513

Monroe County
Columbia Senior Center
Immaculate Conception Catholic Church
411 Palmer Road
Columbia, IL 62236

618-281-7414

Waterloo Senior Multipurpose Center

207 West 4th Street

Waterloo, IL 62298

618-939-8880

Randolph County
Sparta Senior Multipurpose Center
500 West Second Street
Sparta, IL 62286

618-443-4020

Chester Senior Multipurpose Center
805 State Street
Chester, IL 62233

618-826-5108

Red Bud Senior Center
1445 West Market
Red Bud, IL 62278

618-282-6333

Steeleville Senior Center
107 West Broadway
Steeleville, IL 62288

618-965-3134

St. Clair County
Mascoutah Senior Center
227 North Market Street
Mascoutah, IL 62258

618-566-8758

Millstadt Senior Center
102 South Jefferson Street
Millstadt, IL 62260

618-476-3731

Seasoned Circle Café
1274 N. 37th Street
East St. Louis, IL 62205

618-271-2522

Washington County
Nashville Nutrition Site
454 North Hoffman
Nashville, IL 62263

618-327-4078

Okawville Nutrition Site
305 North Nashville Street
Okawville, IL 62271

618-243-6605

618-243-6533

 

If you want to learn more about the services available in your area visit our website….http://agesmart.org/services-in-your-area/.