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Healthy Eating Tips During the Holidays

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy Eating Tips During the Holidays

  • Eat breakfast or snacks earlier in the day and avoid the idea of saving carbs for the big feast.  If you skip meals, it will be harder to manage your blood sugar
  • Limit the number of servings of starchy foods on your plate
  • Choose fruits and vegetables served raw, grilled, or steamed.  Avoid veggies served in cream, gravies, and butter
  • Choose smaller portions of your favorite foods, eat slowly, and savor every bite
  • Take a walk after the meal–avoid sitting or lying down
  • Food safety should be part of any celebration involving food.  A good rule of thumb; Keep hot food hot and cold food cold.  Food left at room temperature for over two hours should be discarded
  • Drink plenty of water before and after a meal to help with digestion and overeating
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Older Adult Family Caregiver Respite Care

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is Respite Care? Respite care provides short-term relief for primary caregivers. It can be arranged for just an afternoon or for several days or weeks. Care can be provided at home, in a healthcare facility, or at an adult day center.

Why? Respite care for loved ones provides short-term breaks for caregivers that can relieve their stress, renew their energy and restore a sense of balance to their lives. Respite care provides a period of freedom from caregiving duties, while loved ones continue to receive the care they require in a safe, caring and professional environment.

Primary caregivers for an aging loved one, may experience some form of stress or burnout. It’s natural for caregivers to become so involved in taking care of someone else that they tend to allow their own needs to get put aside. The problem is- if the caregiver becomes ill or hospitalized then who will be taking care of their loved one?

Caregiver burnout can be associated with serious health issues including depression, and yet burnout is still not recognized as a real health issue in the eyes of many caregivers. Families and communities need to develop sustainable care plans that do not just rely on a single individual.

Respite care will also allow the caregiver to maintain their own lives; to run errands, see their own doctors, participate in social activities, and possibly attend support groups with other caregivers.

Even when caregivers do recognize their need for respite, they might not seek it. For many, it’s hard to carve out the time or money to arrange respite care.

Who Provides Respite? Respite services may be provided in many different formats, home health agencies, community agencies, friend, family, Adult day services and skilled care communities.

Respite care can be as simple as a caregiver accepting offers of help from friends and other family members. Respite care can be certain days of the week scheduled when their loved one is at Adult Day Services. The length of respite care can be as little as 15 minutes to multiple days or weeks. Respite services in a long-term care community can be scheduled if the caregiver must be out of town for an extended period or is having medical procedures done and needs extended recovery time.

Respite care should not be considered a luxury or a weakness, but a necessity for the well-being of the both the caregivers and their aging loved ones.

AgeSmart Community Resources has a participant directed Respite Program that reimburses caregivers up to $100 a month to pay for respite services. Caregivers chose the people/agencies they want to provide respite services and determine the amount the Respite Providers are paid. Caregivers submit a Verification of Services form to AgeSmart at the end of the month and funds are safely reimbursed through electronic deposit to the caregiver. To qualify for the Respite Program, caregivers and care receivers must live in the same household, care receivers must be over the age of 60, younger if they have early onset dementias, and be assessed by the Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurses Services for Seniors before starting the program. All persons providing Respite Care for the Caregiver cannot live in the same household.

For more information about AgeSmart’s Respite program please contact Chris or Melanie at 618-222-2561, cfulton@agesmart.org or mobrien@agesmart.org.

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Medicare Annual Enrollment

From October 15 to December 7th, you can start stop or switch your Medicare Part D enrollment.

SHIP Counselors can provide you with no charge, unbiased  and confidential answers to your questions about Medicare and the coverage you have and want.  SHIP counselors do not work with or for any insurance company and will not not and sell you anything.

It is important for you to evaluate your current coverage and make sure that it will work for you in the upcoming year.

Contact AgeSmart Community Resources to find the SHIP Counselor closest to you in the Illinois Counties of Bond, Clinton, Madison, Monroe, Randolph , St. Clair and Washington.

MEDICARE OPEN ENROLLMENT: ARE YOU READY

                                                                                                                              

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Medicare open enrollment is October 15-December 7th. It is time to compare plans, and make sure you have the right health and prescription drug coverage for you. Stay with your current plan if you are happy with it. Or look for a new one with better coverage, higher quality, and lower costs.

If you need help with comparing your coverage you can contact a local Senior Health Insurance Counselor (SHIP) for FREE, UNBIASED, & CONFIDENTIAL assistance. The SHIP Counselor is a person who volunteers to objectively counsel Medicare Beneficiaries, their caregivers or representatives who have problems and/or questions with Medicare, Medicare Supplement, Medicare managed care or long-term care insurance. The SHIP counselors near you are:

Bond County
Bond County Senior Center 618-664-1465

 

Clinton County
Clinton County Senior Center 618-594-2321
OFACIL 618-244-9212

 

Madison County
Collinsville Faith in Action 618-344-7788
Collinsville Senior Center 618-344-7787
Edwardsville Twsp 618-656-0232
The Oasis Institute 1-800-633-4227
Senior Services Plus 618-465-3298

 

Monroe County
Waterloo Senior Center 618-939-8880
LINC 618-282-2123

 

Randolph County
Chester Senior Center 618-826-5108
Sparta Senior Center 618-443-4020

 

St. Clair County
AgeSmart 618-222-2561
HealthVisions-ESTL 618-271-7000
Senior Services Plus (SWIC Programs and Services for Older Persons) 618-234-4410 Ext: 7028

 

Washington County
Washington Co. Senior Services 618-243-6533
OFACIL 618-244-9212

 

Still waiting for your new Medicare Card?
Your new Medicare card should have arrived in the mail by now. If you didn’t get it here is what to do next:
• Look around the house for any old or unopened mail. Your Medicare card will come in a plain white envelope from the Department of Health and Human Services.
• If you still can’t find it, call 1-800-MEDICARE. Call center representatives can help you check your address and fix it if needed.
• In the meantime, user your current Medicare card to get health care services.

 

Grandparents Day is September 9th

Grandparents 2018

The proportion of children living with grandparents has doubled in the U.S. since 1970. Nearly 100,000 grandparents in Illinois are living with and responsible for their own grandchildren under the age of 18.  Many grandparents become caregivers during or because of a major life crisis.  As the children’s parents struggle with substance abuse, mental illness, incarceration, economic hardship, and other challenges, these caregivers provide a vital safety net to children.  In addition to the emotional impact, these grandparents often need assistance to help navigate their way through a variety of family issues, including legal and custody, financial, and parenting skills.

The Grandparents Raising Grandchildren Program funded by AgeSmart provides education, respite, and emergency financial assistance as well as legal resources to the grandparents living in Southwestern Illinois.  Grandparents or relatives who are 55 years of age or older and caring for a child under 18 years of age are eligible for the services, regardless of income.  The services are available in Bond, Clinton, Madison, Monroe, Randolph, St. Clair, and Washington Counties and provided by local community organizations.  Contact the organizations below for more information.

Children’s Home and Aid  618-235-2335
Land of Lincoln Legal Assistance Foundation  618-398-0958
AgeSmart Community Resources  618-222-2561

5 Facts About Social Security from ssa.gov

5 Facts You Might Not Know About Social Security

Most people know at least something about Social Security. For decades, Social Security has been providing valuable information and tools to help you build financial security. Here’s your opportunity to find out a little more, with some lesser-known facts about Social Security.

1. Social Security pays benefits to children.

Social Security pays benefits to unmarried children whose parents are deceased, disabled, or retired. See Benefits for Children for the specific requirements.

2. Social Security can pay benefits to parents.

Most people know that when a worker dies, we can pay benefits to surviving spouses and children. What you may not know is that under certain circumstances, we can pay benefits to a surviving parent. Read our Fact Sheet Parent’s Benefits, for the details.

3. Widows’ and widowers’ payments can continue if remarriage occurs after age 60.

Remarriage ends survivor’s benefits when it occurs before age 60, but benefits can continue for marriages after age 60.

4. If a spouse draws reduced retirement benefits before starting spouse’s benefits (his or her spouse is younger), the spouse will not receive 50 percent of the worker’s benefit amount.

Your full spouse’s benefit could be up to 50 percent of your spouse’s full retirement age amount if you are full retirement age when you take it. If you qualify for your own retirement benefit and a spouse’s benefit, we always pay your own benefit first. (For example, you are eligible for $400 from your own retirement and $150 as a spouse for a total of $550.) The reduction rates for retirement and spouses benefits are different. If your spouse is younger, you cannot receive benefits unless he or she is receiving benefits (except for divorced spouses). If you took your reduced retirement first while waiting for your spouse to reach retirement age, when you add spouse’s benefits later, your own retirement portion remains reduced which causes the total retirement and spouses benefit together to total less than 50 percent of the worker’s amount. You can find out more on our website.

5. If your spouse’s retirement benefit is higher than your retirement benefit, and he or she chooses to take reduced benefits and dies first, your survivor benefit will be reduced, but may be higher than what your spouse received.

If the deceased worker started receiving reduced retirement benefits before their full retirement age, a special rule called the retirement insurance benefit limit may apply to the surviving spouse. The retirement insurance benefit limit is the maximum survivor benefit you may receive. Generally, the limit is the higher of:

  • The reduced monthly retirement benefit to which the deceased spouse would have been entitled if they had lived, or
  • 82.5 percent of the unreduced deceased spouse’s monthly benefit if they had started receiving benefits at their full retirement age (rather than choosing to receive a reduced retirement benefit early).

Social Security helps secure your financial future by providing the facts you need to make life’s important decisions.

This information is from the Social Security website at https://blog.ssa.gov/5-facts-you-might-not-know-about-social-security/

Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurse Association Celebrates its 100th Anniversary

 

Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurse Association Celebrates its

100th Anniversary

A walk through the last 100 years.

Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurse Association (SIVNA) officially began on January 1, 1918 with a staff of five nurses and sixty-three patients transferred from the St. Louis Visiting Nurse Association.  Cash on hand was $600 in borrowed funds and a contract with Metropolitan Life Insurance Company to provide nursing care to eligible policy-holders. Currently SIVNA has a staff of 92 and serve just over 10,000 people in 2017.

Providing nursing care to the sick and injured in their home regardless of race, creed or their ability to pay and working with community organizations to improve the health of its residents was what drove their work in 1918 and still does today.  The great influenza pandemic of 1918 enabled the agency to provide a valuable service to the community.   During that epidemic between 50 and 100 million people are thought to have died, representing as much as 5 percent of the world’s population.  That was the beginning of a long tradition of caring for the SIVNA.

Many of the projects SIVNA pioneered have become the function of state and local agencies such as the Child Welfare Program.  In their first year 3,188 infants and children to age 6 were weighed, measured and given nutritional counseling.  This was a joint program of SIVNA, Red Cross and a child specialist.  These later became the infant welfare conferences and were continued by the East Side Health District when it was organized in 1937.

SIVNA worked closely with the Tuberculosis Society in providing nursing care to the tuberculosis patients.  During 1921, these two organizations working with a physician began school health examinations.  Also in 1921, assisted by the State Board of Health, four clinics for crippled children were conducted.  A special fund was established by the Board to pay for braces, casts and other corrective appliances.

The East St. Louis Journal assisted the agency in establishing a milk and ice fund for indigent infants and children.  This fund was established in 1921 and continued through 1945. Dental health was another concern in the early years.  Queen’s Daughters assisted in the purchase and distribution of toothbrushes for every school child in East St. Louis.

The 50’s and 60’s brought new organizations and additional community services.  In 1951, SIVNA began to work with the Cancer Society which furnished funds for nursing care of cancer patients, dressings and supplies.  In 1959, the George Washington Hi-12 Club began their hospital bed project with 35 beds.  This project was carried on by a special committee of the club.

January 1959, the SIVNA Board gave their approval to serve as the parent organization for the proposed home care program.  January 1960, rehabilitative restorative nursing was initiated.  One nurse attended a special course at the Rusk Institute in New York an on July 1, 1961, a homemaker program began on a three-year pilot basis with private funding administered by a Board of Directors.  The coordination of health services, home-helper, or home health aide services has been an invaluable supplement to the nursing program. On July 1, 1966, SIVNA became a provider under Medicare.  SIVNA was instrumental in working with the Medicare program in the early years as problems were identified and worked through.

A grant under the Older Americans Act of 1965 made it possible to extend services to cover all of St. Clair County.  The Illinois Department of Public Aid, St. Clair County Board of Supervisors, together with agency personnel and equipment, enabled SIVNA to qualify for these funds.  The grant was for a three-year period and provided nursing care to patients age 60 and over.  This program officially began January 1, 1967.

Changes in funding and Medicare services indicated the need for a merger of the Home Care Association and SIVNA.  The Home Health Aide Service became certified July 1, 1967 and final details of the merger were completed January 1, 1968.

During the 70’s and 80’s, the agency continued its growth and expansion of programs.  The hospital coordinating role was initiated to establish a closer working relationship with hospitals, physicians, and patients.  Under Title III, Home Health Service was expanded to Monroe County and a homemaker program was initiated.

In 1983, through a contract with the Illinois Department on Aging, and the Area Agency on Aging of Southwestern Illinois (now AgeSmart Community Resources), the agency became responsible for the Care Coordination Unit (CCU) and Title III programs.  Assessments for homemaker, housekeeping, chore, daycare, and pre-screenings for nursing home placement are performed by SIVNA care coordinators in our service area.

December 1990, a contract was signed with the Illinois Department on Aging to follow up on victims of adult abuse.  SIVNA’s team of Senior Protective Services was one of the first in the state established to participate in the program.

In 1996, the Choices for Care Program was initiated by the Illinois Department on Aging to provide early counseling to individuals seeking long term care services before being discharged from the hospital.  SIVNA’s CCU has experienced care coordinators who explain all available alternatives to those in need of long term care, including services that can be provided at home. In 2000 SIVNA’s Care Coordination Unit was awarded additional territory by the Illinois Department on Aging. The CCU now serves the Illinois counties of St. Clair, Madison, Monroe, Randolph, Washington, Bond and Clinton.

In 2013, SIVNA’s Senior Protective Services was expanded to serve disabled adults as well.  The program’s name was changed to Adult Protective Services.

Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurse Association continues now as in years past to provide superior individualized care to residents in our service area.  SIVNA is uniquely able to meet all the needs of area residents who seek to maintain their independence and dignity. Congratulations on 100 years!

 

For more information about SIVNA visit their website at sivna.com or give them a call 618-236-5863

ONE IN FIVE AMERICANS OVER 50 ARE AFFECTED BY ISOLATION

As we age circumstances in our lives often change.  We retire from a job, friends move away or health issues convince us to eliminate or restrict driving.  When changes like these occur, we may not fully realize how they will affect our ability to stay connected and engaged and how much they can still impact our overall health and well-being.

We need social connections to thrive, no matter our age, but recent research shows the negative health consequences of chronic isolation and loneliness may be especially harmful for older adults.  The good news is that with greater awareness, we can take steps to maintain and strengthen our ties to family and friends, expand our social circles and become more involved in the community around us.

Having a social network that meets our needs means different things to everyone.  There are some actions to consider to help stay connected.

  • Nurture and strengthen existing relationships: invite people over for coffee or call them to suggest a trip to a museum or to see a movie.
  • Schedule a time each day to call a friend or visit someone.
  • Meet your neighbors young and old.
  • Don’t let being a non-driver stop you from staying active. Find out about your transportation options.
  • Use social media like Facebook to stay in touch with long-distance friends or write an old-fashioned letter.
  • Stay physically active and include group exercise in the mix, like joining a walking club.
  • Take a class to learn something new, at the same time, expand your circle of friends.
  • Revisit an old hobby you’ve set aside and connect with others who share our interests.
  • Volunteer to deepen your sense of purpose and help others.
  • Visit your local community wellness or senior center and become involved in a wide range of interesting programs.
  • Check out faith-based organizations for spiritual engagement, as well as to participate in activities and events.
  • Get involved in your community by taking on a cause, such as making your community more age-friendly.

Prolonged isolation can be as bad for your health as 15 cigarettes a day.  Stay engaged and remember the older adults in your lives and reach out to them this holiday season and throughout the year.

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