AuthorTamara Foote

Home/Articles Posted by Tamara Foote

Friendship Line

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

FRIENDSHIP……..

“Our connections to others are what bind us to life.”
– Patrick Arbore

 

The Institute on Aging’s 24-hour toll-free Friendship Line is the only accredited crisis line in the country for people aged 60 years and older, and adults living with disabilities. While there are other organizations that respond to the needs of people who may be contemplating suicide, none provides the type of services that IOA’s Friendship Line offers to respond to the public health problem of suicide among the elderly. Knowing that older people do not contact traditional suicide prevention centers on a regular basis even if they are considering suicide, They created the only program nationwide that reaches out to lonely, depressed, isolated, frail and/or suicidal older adults. Their trained volunteers specialize in offering a caring ear and having a friendly conversation with depressed older adults.

The Friendship Line is both a crisis intervention hotline and a warmline for non-emergency emotional support calls. Founded in 1973 by Dr. Patrick Arbore, Director of IOA’s Center for Elderly Suicide Prevention, and accredited by the American Association of Suicidology, Friendship Line provides round-the-clock crisis support services including:

• Providing emotional support
• Elder abuse reporting
• Grief support through assistance and reassurance
• Active suicide intervention
• Information and referrals for isolated older adults, and adults living with disabilities.

Friendship Line 1-800-971-0016
Sometimes the road to happiness begins by simply saying hello to someone who cares. -Institute on Aging

 

Continue Reading

Home Delivered Meals

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

When older adults cannot leave their homes and cannot personally prepare nutritious meals, home delivered meals are an available option.  Volunteers who deliver meals to homebound older persons have an important opportunity to check on the welfare of the homebound elderly and are encouraged to report any health or other problems that they may observe during their visits.

AgeSmart funds 10 nutrition providers throughout 7 counties serving over 1200 meals every day. Last year, we provided 330,000 meals 2200 unduplicated clients.

 

To be eligible for HDM, an older adult must be assessed by CCU.
Must be 60 or older / adult child with disability living with an eligible older adult
Not means-tested
No charge / suggested donation only – $ goes back into program to maintain program

 

Here is a list of providers in your community:

Bond County
Bond County Senior Center
1001 E. Harris Ave
Greenville, IL 62246

618-664-1465

Clinton Country
Clinton County Senior Service Inc.
630 Eighth Street
Carlyle, IL 62231

618-594-2321

O.W. Billhartz Civic Center
100 East Birch
New Baden, IL 62265

618-224-9913

Western Clinton Co. Senior Services
520 North Main Street
Trenton, IL 62293

618-224-9913

Madison County
Senior Services Plus
2603 North Rodgers Avenue
Alton, IL 62002

618-465-3298

Granite City Nutrition Site
2060 Delmar Avenue
Granite City, IL 62040

618-877-0513

Monroe County
Columbia Senior Center
Immaculate Conception Catholic Church
411 Palmer Road
Columbia, IL 62236

618-281-7414

Waterloo Senior Multipurpose Center

207 West 4th Street

Waterloo, IL 62298

618-939-8880

Randolph County
Sparta Senior Multipurpose Center
500 West Second Street
Sparta, IL 62286

618-443-4020

Chester Senior Multipurpose Center
805 State Street
Chester, IL 62233

618-826-5108

Red Bud Senior Center
1445 West Market
Red Bud, IL 62278

618-282-6333

Steeleville Senior Center
107 West Broadway
Steeleville, IL 62288

618-965-3134

St. Clair County
Mascoutah Senior Center
227 North Market Street
Mascoutah, IL 62258

618-566-8758

Millstadt Senior Center
102 South Jefferson Street
Millstadt, IL 62260

618-476-3731

Seasoned Circle Café
1274 N. 37th Street
East St. Louis, IL 62205

618-271-2522

Washington County
Nashville Nutrition Site
454 North Hoffman
Nashville, IL 62263

618-327-4078

Okawville Nutrition Site
305 North Nashville Street
Okawville, IL 62271

618-243-6605

618-243-6533

 

If you want to learn more about the services available in your area visit our website….http://agesmart.org/services-in-your-area/.

 

 

 

 

 

Embrace Your Aging with Aging Mastery Program

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Americans are living longer. America’s older population will double by 2030 and 20% of the population will be 65 years and older by 2050. Education and resources that empowers people to embrace their longevity and live their lives to the fullest is more important than ever. As children, we learn how to be successful adults, but no one teaches us how to age well. As a result, most are unprepared for this new stage in life.

Enter Aging Mastery Program.

Developed by National Council on Aging, the Aging Mastery Program® is a comprehensive evidence-based program that is designed to inform, encourage, and support older adults as they take steps to improve their lives and stay engaged in their communities. The program incorporates evidence-informed materials, expert speakers, group discussion, peer support, and small rewards to give participants the skills and tools they need to achieve measurable improvements in managing their health, remaining economically secure, and increasing social connectedness.

Core curriculum of this 10-session workshop includes topics such as healthy eating and hydration, sleep, financial fitness, advance planning, medication management, and healthy relationships. The program encourages individuals to make and maintain small, impactful changes to their behaviors to live a healthier, happier, and more secure life.

Ready to embrace your own aging? Registration for our upcoming Aging Mastery Program® is now open. We hope to see you there!

Shiloh Senior Center
7 Park Dr. Shiloh, IL 62269
Tuesday, March 5 – May 7, 10:00 – 12:00
To register, call 314-862-4859, ext. 24.

To learn about other wellness programs, contact AgeSmart at 618-222-2561.

Social Isolation

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Within normal circumstances related to age, this can cause an older adult to lose connections. This loss of connection has a real impact on a person’s overall health. People need social connections to thrive. About 29% of people 65 and over live alone. The potential of prolonged isolation can be as bad for your health as smoking 15 cigarettes a day. (AARP Foundation 2012) Loneliness is linked to serious health problems and death among older adults. (University of California San Francisco June 2012)

In the Metro East there are approximately 30,000 older adults who have the potential of being isolated or lonely. This is a topic many do not think about and people may not even realize they are experiencing loneliness. In the UK, there is a Ministry for loneliness because they recognize the negative health effects. Loneliness is not a normal part of aging. We need greater awareness that it is a severe problem and many reminders to stay connected with family and friends.
For more information contact AgeSmart at 618-222-2561.

Continue Reading

Tai Chi for Arthritis and Fall Prevention

 

Arthritis is one of the most common chronic conditions that impact older adults’ ability to live at home. Millions of adults are limited by arthritis in their ability to walk, climb stairs, bend, or kneel, or participate in regular social activities. Tai Chi, an ancient Chinese practice is gaining popularity as a way to fight off the crippling pain of arthritis and increase flexibility and strength without straining joints.

Its slow, gentle, fluid movements along with deep breathing, this mind-body practice can help reduce pain and stiffness exercising most of the muscles and joints throughout the body. It can also help you relax and improve your sense of well-being, which is important in helping you deal with pain. Tai Chi is also associated with improved balance and reduced risk of falls. It is safe for people of all ages and it’s especially beneficial to older adults who can’t perform more vigorous forms of physical activity.

If you or your loved ones are struggling with joint pain and limited mobility, there’s an excellent chance that Tai Chi can help.
To find a Tai Chi class near you, contact AgeSmart at 618-222-2561.

 

Continue Reading

Help Change Someone’s Life

It is amazing what a handful of caring and giving individuals can do. With gifts to AgeSmart Community Resources you can assure that older adults have services they need to stay well, healthy and in the community. With your help this year Mr. D was able to come back home after a long nursing home stay.   Listen to his story……..

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zfyIMtG-naA&feature=youtu.be

 

 

Continue Reading

AgeSmart Community Resources in on the Move!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In Spring of 2019 AgeSmart Community Resources, the Local Area Agency on Aging will be moving to 801 West State Street in O’Fallon, IL. In the past ten years the programs AgeSmart provides for older adults, caregivers and veterans have expanded and they have outgrew their current space. The new location will better support the services and the people served by AgeSmart.

With the move AgeSmart will be adding an Education Center which will host a multitude of informative and interactive programs for the community. Some of these activities are health and wellness programs such as A Matter of Balance, a fall prevention program and Tai Chi others include New to Medicare seminars, Fraud Prevention, Aging Well and more. Activities will be listed on AgeSmart’s website www.AgeSmart.org.

The current home to AgeSmart is on the market. Check it out at: https://barbermurphy.com/properties/744-2365-Country-Rd-Shiloh-Illinois-62221-St-Clair-County/

Visit AgeSmart in the Spring of 2019!

What You Should Know About Older Drivers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Older adults are statistically the safest drivers on the road.* Older drivers are more likely to use their seat belts and less likely to drive impaired. The number of accidents that involve older drivers decreases as age increases. Older drivers tend to drive when conditions are best and avoid busy rush hours and night driving. Sharing the roads with older drivers poses negligible risk to other drivers.**

Drivers over 70 do have a higher risk of accidents compared to other age groups and have more collisions than middle age drivers but not as many as young drivers. Limiting driving as a person ages depends on each individual. Age is not the whole picture. Age does affect motor skills and alertness but is different for everyone. It is unfair to say that all aging adults are affected to the same extent as others.

Eighteen states require older drivers to renew their licenses more frequently. In Illinois drivers over 75 are required to take a road test. California is unique and requires older adults to renew in person with an exam and written test every 5 years and Doctors must report when they feel a patient is exhibiting features that might inhibit their driving.

The ability to drive is related to health rather than age. Older drivers can do some things related to health to make them safer drivers.

• See the eye doctor every 1-2 years after 65
• Have your hearing tested every 3 years after age 50.
• If someone has dementia it is important to keep communication about driving open. People with dementia will eventually become unsafe but the question is: at what point? In the early stages of dementia many people are able to manage activities like driving.
• Read the warning labels on medications.
• Stay physically active.

Here are some tips from an 87-year-old driver who is a volunteer at AgeSmart.

When on longer trips:
• Plan your route in advance,
• Stop frequently, walk around,
• Enroute ask Siri for directions, Siri’s oral instructions such as “in half mile get in right lane to exit and McDonalds is on your right” etc.

Driving is an individual decision, based on many factors. Like anything related to aging, plan ahead, do your research and communicate with family.

For most people driving means independence. It is a way to get to appointments, go shopping and stay connected to the community. With the loss of this ability people become isolated and lonely and dependent on others. If you or someone you know is thinking of putting away the keys call your Area Agency on Aging or in the Metro East Illinois AgeSmart Community Resources to find out what options for transportation are available in your community. Call 618-222-2561 or visit www.AgeSmart.org.

Other resources:

Memorial Hospital Driver Rehabilitation Program – www.independentdriver.com
618-257-5250
AARP Driver Safety – www.aarpdriversafety.org
AgeSmart Community Resources – www.AgeSmart.org 618-222-2561
Alzheimer’s Association – https://www.alz.org/greatermissouri
800-272-3900

Source: *National Institute on Aging, **Source: National Highway Traffic Safety Administration

 

Healthy Eating Tips During the Holidays

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Healthy Eating Tips During the Holidays

  • Eat breakfast or snacks earlier in the day and avoid the idea of saving carbs for the big feast.  If you skip meals, it will be harder to manage your blood sugar
  • Limit the number of servings of starchy foods on your plate
  • Choose fruits and vegetables served raw, grilled, or steamed.  Avoid veggies served in cream, gravies, and butter
  • Choose smaller portions of your favorite foods, eat slowly, and savor every bite
  • Take a walk after the meal–avoid sitting or lying down
  • Food safety should be part of any celebration involving food.  A good rule of thumb; Keep hot food hot and cold food cold.  Food left at room temperature for over two hours should be discarded
  • Drink plenty of water before and after a meal to help with digestion and overeating
Continue Reading

Older Adult Family Caregiver Respite Care

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What is Respite Care? Respite care provides short-term relief for primary caregivers. It can be arranged for just an afternoon or for several days or weeks. Care can be provided at home, in a healthcare facility, or at an adult day center.

Why? Respite care for loved ones provides short-term breaks for caregivers that can relieve their stress, renew their energy and restore a sense of balance to their lives. Respite care provides a period of freedom from caregiving duties, while loved ones continue to receive the care they require in a safe, caring and professional environment.

Primary caregivers for an aging loved one, may experience some form of stress or burnout. It’s natural for caregivers to become so involved in taking care of someone else that they tend to allow their own needs to get put aside. The problem is- if the caregiver becomes ill or hospitalized then who will be taking care of their loved one?

Caregiver burnout can be associated with serious health issues including depression, and yet burnout is still not recognized as a real health issue in the eyes of many caregivers. Families and communities need to develop sustainable care plans that do not just rely on a single individual.

Respite care will also allow the caregiver to maintain their own lives; to run errands, see their own doctors, participate in social activities, and possibly attend support groups with other caregivers.

Even when caregivers do recognize their need for respite, they might not seek it. For many, it’s hard to carve out the time or money to arrange respite care.

Who Provides Respite? Respite services may be provided in many different formats, home health agencies, community agencies, friend, family, Adult day services and skilled care communities.

Respite care can be as simple as a caregiver accepting offers of help from friends and other family members. Respite care can be certain days of the week scheduled when their loved one is at Adult Day Services. The length of respite care can be as little as 15 minutes to multiple days or weeks. Respite services in a long-term care community can be scheduled if the caregiver must be out of town for an extended period or is having medical procedures done and needs extended recovery time.

Respite care should not be considered a luxury or a weakness, but a necessity for the well-being of the both the caregivers and their aging loved ones.

AgeSmart Community Resources has a participant directed Respite Program that reimburses caregivers up to $100 a month to pay for respite services. Caregivers chose the people/agencies they want to provide respite services and determine the amount the Respite Providers are paid. Caregivers submit a Verification of Services form to AgeSmart at the end of the month and funds are safely reimbursed through electronic deposit to the caregiver. To qualify for the Respite Program, caregivers and care receivers must live in the same household, care receivers must be over the age of 60, younger if they have early onset dementias, and be assessed by the Southwestern Illinois Visiting Nurses Services for Seniors before starting the program. All persons providing Respite Care for the Caregiver cannot live in the same household.

For more information about AgeSmart’s Respite program please contact Chris or Melanie at 618-222-2561, cfulton@agesmart.org or mobrien@agesmart.org.

Continue Reading